Equipo del componente de los ecosistemas terrestres de INOGO


Rodolfo Dirzo a,b
Eben North Broadbent b,c **
Angélica María Almeyda Zambrano b,c
Lucía Morales Barquero c,d
Sandra Lucía Almeyda Zambrano b,c
Carlos Alberto Quispe Gil b,c,e

Department of Biology, Stanford University ( http://biology.stanford.edu ) 
Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University ( http://woods.stanford.edu )
Spatial Ecology and Conservation (SPEC) Lab, Department of Geography, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa ( http://speclab.ua.edu )
FONASO program, Bangor University, UK and Goettingen University, Germany ( http://fonaso.eu )
Amazon Conservation Association ( http://www.amazonconservation.org )

* Para aprender más sobre INOGO visite nuestro sitio web: http://inogo.stanford.edu
** Por favor contactarme con cualquier pregunta a: eben@ua.edu



Rodolfo Dirzo, PhD, is a senior fellow in the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, a Bing Professor in Environmental Science, and a Professor in the Department of Biology at Stanford University. Rodolfo Dirzo specializes in the ecology of tropical ecosystems. In particular, he studies plant-animal interactions from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Recently, he has been focusing his work on the consequences of anthropogenic impact (deforestation, fragmentation, defaunation) on tropical ecosystems, in particular in terms of the disruption of ecological processes, such as biotic interactions. He is also interested in teaching and education on the relevance of biological conservation.

Eben North Broadbent, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Alabama where he co-leads the Spatial Ecology and Conservation Lab in collaboration with Angelica M. Almeyda Zambrano and is an affiliated researcher with the Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford University. He holds a PhD in biology from Stanford University, a MS in forestry from the University of Florida, and a BA in Botany from the University of Vermont.  A recent version of his CV is available for download at: https://www.dropbox.com/s/37zfjg4eszj9aks/Broadbent_CV.pdf Please see his personal website at:  http://www.amazonico.org/eben & http://speclab.ua.edu/eben-broadbent.html

Angelica María Almeyda Zambrano, PhD, is an adjunct professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Alabama where she co-leads the Spatial Ecology and Conservation Lab in collaboration with Eben N. Broadbent and is an affiliated researcher with the Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford University. She holds a PhD in anthropology from Stanford University, a MS in Latin American studies from the University of Florida, and a BS in forestry from the Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina in Lima, Peru.  A recent version of her CV is available for download at: https://www.dropbox.com/s/x22f7nlwblkmk5o/Almeyda_CV.pdf Please see her personal website at: http://www.amazonico.org/angelica & http://speclab.ua.edu/angelica-almeyda-zambrano.html

Lucía Morales Barquero is a PhD Candidate in the FONASO program affiliated with Bangor University, UK and Goettingen University, Germany. Lucia is interested in patterns of cover change in tropical forests and how these patterns affect ecosystem services, mainly carbon sequestration and biodiversity. By combining community surveys and local data sources with GIS and remote sensing analysis she studied changes in tropical forest cover patterns and their context. She has work experience in tropical dry forests, rainforests and mangrove ecosystems, carrying out field work in Costa Rica, Nepal, Indonesia, and Mexico. After finishing her degree in tropical Biology, she worked for the Center of Environmental Law and Natural Resources, Costa Rica (CEDARENA). This project identified key biodiversity properties within the Osa Peninsula Biological Corridor and parallel work with landowners to allocate payment for environmental services to these key properties. She holds an MSc degree from ITC Geo-information Science for Natural Resources Management from the University of Twente, The Netherlands. Currently she is finishing her PhD which focus on improving monitoring of tropical forests degradation at a landscape level and the implications monitoring schemes has for incentives such as REDD+ (Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation).  Part of her PhD work has been developed in the Osa Peninsula; where she also collaborated with the Initiative Osa/Golfito (INOGO) lead by Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment University, Stanford University. Ultimately she aims to develop projects that integrate sustainable use of natural resources in tropical forests and improve the livelihood of local communities that depend on these forests. She expects to complete her PhD late 2014.

Sandra Lucía Almeyda Zambrano holds a BS degree and forest engineering certification from “Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina”. She is a Masters student affiliated with the Spatial Ecology and Conservation Lab, and advised by Eben Broadbent, in the Department of Geography at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa. She is currently defining her MS thesis research topic, which may take place in the Osa Peninsula region of Costa Rica where Dr. Eben Broadbent and Dr. Angelica Almeyda Zambrano are leading a number of ongoing projects. Please see her personal website at: http://www.peruconservation.org/sandra

Carlos Alberto Quispe Gil is a Biologist educated at the National University San Antonio Abad in Cusco, Perú. He is an affiliated researcher with the Spatial Ecology and Conservation Lab of the Department of Geography at the University of Alabama. He currently is the scientific coordinator at the Amazon Conservation Association Los Amigos field station in the Peruvian Amazon. His core interest is to contribute to biodiversity conservation in Peru, and since 2007 he has collaborated on conservation projects with government, non profits and private institutions. Please see his personal webpage at: 
http://www.peruconservation.org/carlosalberto